Calls for unity and promises of bringing Americans together have been a staple in nearly every Democratic candidate for presidents campaign. Joe Biden says we need a president who can bring people together. Pete Buttigieg says he wants to lead a United America. And while appearing on The View, Senator Amy Klobuchar said we need to bring people in instead of shutting them out, including people who are against access to abortion care. 
Kumbaya-esque mental images of people who support unfettered bodily autonomy and those who oppose it might seem ideal to the centrist Democrat from Minnesota, but Klobuchar arguing that the Democratic party should make room for anti-abortion voters is disqualifying. In an effort to bring people together, Klobuchar is throwing the people who consistently show up for the Democratic party under the proverbial bus. 
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On Tuesday, The View host Meghan McCain asked Klobuchar, Do you think theres room for pro-life Democrats to vote for you? Klobuchar responded, Im strongly pro-choice. I have always been pro-choice, but I believe were a big tent party. And there are pro-life Democrats, and they are part of our party. And I think we need to build a big tent.
She shared a similar sentiment with a potential male voter who asked her if theres room in her coalition for pro-life people. According to this voter, Klobuchar said, Yes of course. He also asked if shed try to find common ground on bringing down the number of abortions, and Klobuchar responded by saying yes and sharing her work in the adoption caucus in the Senate. 
Klobuchar isnt the only Democrat running for president who has attempted to appease anti-choicers. Senator Bernie Sanders, who won the New Hampshire primary, campaigned for an anti-choice mayoral candidate in 2017. While touting the need for a more progressive party, Sanders defended his decision, telling NPR We have got to appreciate where people come from, and do our best to fight for the pro-choice agenda. But I think you just cant exclude people who disagree with us on one issue. 
But the right to access safe, legal, affordable abortion care, sans unnecessary waiting periods and other legislated barriers, is more than just a political issue. Studies have shown that when pregnant people cannot have the abortions they want and need, theyre more likely to experience serious pregnancy complications, more likely to suffer from depression and anxiety, and more likely to stay with abusive partners. Theyre also more likely to live below the federal poverty level, and more likely to give up on career and/or educational aspirations. 
Limiting access to abortion also hurts children. The Turnaway Study, which examined what happens to when when theyre denied abortion, found that children of those who cannot access the care they need are more likely to live in poverty and less likely to achieve developmental milestones.
These negative impacts are felt by black, brown, and poor pregnant people the most the very people who are responsible for the Democratic partys success. While white voters are more inclined to vote Republican, according to the Pew Research Study, black, Latinx, and Asian voters are overwhelming Democrat. And even though 53 per cent of white women voted for Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election, 56 per cent of women overall affiliate with or lean toward the Democratic party. 
The big tent Klobuchar wants to build for anti-choice voters will be built on the backs of the very people she needs to ascend to the presidency.  
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1/25 Bernie Sanders
The Vermont senator has launched a second bid for president after losing out to Hilary Clinton in the 2016 Democratic primaries. He is running on a similar platform of democratic socialist reform
2/25 Joe Biden
The former vice president recently faced scrutiny for inappropriate touching of women, but was thought to deal with the criticism well and has since maintained a front runner status in national polling
3/25 Elizabeth Warren
The Massachusetts senator is a progressive Democrat, and a major supporter of regulating Wall Street
4/25 DROPPED OUT: Bill De Blasio
The New York mayor announced his bid on 16 May 2019. He emerged in 2013 as a leading voice in the left wing of his party but struggled to build a national profile and has suffered a number of political setbacks in his time as mayor
5/25 Pete Buttigieg
The centrist Indiana mayor and war veteran would be the first openly LGBT+ president in American history
6/25 Michael Bloomberg
Michael Bloomberg, a late addition to the 2020 race, announced his candidacy after months of speculation in November. He has launched a massive ad-buying campaign and issued an apology for the controversial “stop and frisk” programme that adversely impacted minority communities in New York City when he was mayor
7/25 DROPPED OUT: Beto O’Rourke
The former Texas congressman formally launched his bid for the presidency in March. He ran on a progressive platform, stating that the US is driven by “gross differences in opportunity and outcome”
8/25 DROPPED OUT: Steve Bullock
The Montana governor announced his bid on 14 May. He stated “We need to defeat Donald Trump in 2020 and defeat the corrupt system that lets campaign money drown out the people’s voice, so we can finally make good on the promise of a fair shot for everyone.” He also highlighted the fact that he won the governor’s seat in a red [Republican] state
9/25 DROPPED OUT: Cory Booker
The New Jersey Senator has focused on restoring kindness and civility in American politics throughout his campaign, though he has failed to secure the same level of support and fundraising as several other senators running for the White House in 2020
10/25 DROPPED OUT: Wayne Messam
Mayor of the city of Miramar in the Miami metropolitan area, Wayne Messam said he intended to run on a progressive platform against the “broken” federal government. He favours gun regulations and was a signatory to a letter from some 400 mayors condemning President Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris Climate Accord
11/25 DROPPED OUT: Kirsten Gillibrand
The New York Senator formally announced her presidential bid in January, saying that healthcare should be a right, not a privilege
12/25 DROPPED OUT: Kamala Harris
The former California attorney general was introduced to the national stage during Jeff Sessions testimony. She has endorsed Medicare-for-all and proposed a major tax-credit for the middle class
13/25 DROPPED OUT: John Delaney
The Maryland congressman was the first to launch his bid for presidency, making the announcement in 2017
14/25 Tulsi Gabbard
The Hawaii congresswoman announced her candidacy in January, but has faced tough questions on her past comments on LGBT+ rights and her stance on Syrian President Bashar al-Assad
15/25 DROPPED OUT: Andrew Yang
The entrepreneur announced his presidential candidacy by pledging that he would introduce a universal basic income of $1,000 a month to every American over the age of 18
16/25 DROPPED OUT: Julian Castro
The former San Antonio mayor announced his candidacy in January and said that his running has a special meaning for the Latino community in the US
17/25 DROPPED OUT: Marianne Williamson
The author and spiritual adviser has announced her intention to run for president. She had previously run for congress as an independent in 2014 but was unsuccessful
18/25 DROPPED OUT: Eric Swalwell
One of the younger candidates, Swalwell has served on multiple committees in the House of Representatives. He intended to make gun control central to his campaign but dropped out after his team said it was clear there was no path to victory
19/25 DROPPED OUT: Seth Moulton
A Massachusetts congressman, Moulton is a former US soldier who is best known for trying to stop Nancy Pelosi from becoming speaker of the house. He dropped out of the race after not polling well in key states
20/25 Amy Klobuchar
Klobuchar is a Minnesota senator who earned praise for her contribution to the Brett Kavanaugh hearings
21/25 DROPPED OUT: Jay Inslee
Inslee has been governor of Washington since 2013. His bid was centred around climate change
22/25 DROPPED OUT: John Hickenlooper
The former governor of Colorado aimed to sell himself as an effective leader who was open to compromise, but failed to make a splash on the national stage
23/25 DROPPED OUT: Tim Ryan
Ohio representative Tim Ryan ran on a campaign that hinged on his working class roots, though his messaging did not appear to resonate with voters
24/25 Deval Patrick
The former Massachusetts governor launched a late 2020 candidacy and received very little reception. With just a few short months until the first voters flock to the polls, the former governor is running as a centrist and believes he can unite the party’s various voting blocs
25/25 Tom Steyer
Democratic presidential hopeful billionaire and philanthropist Tom Steyer is a longtime Democratic donor
1/25 Bernie Sanders
The Vermont senator has launched a second bid for president after losing out to Hilary Clinton in the 2016 Democratic primaries. He is running on a similar platform of democratic socialist reform
2/25 Joe Biden
The former vice president recently faced scrutiny for inappropriate touching of women, but was thought to deal with the criticism well and has since maintained a front runner status in national polling
3/25 Elizabeth Warren
The Massachusetts senator is a progressive Democrat, and a major supporter of regulating Wall Street
4/25 DROPPED OUT: Bill De Blasio
The New York mayor announced his bid on 16 May 2019. He emerged in 2013 as a leading voice in the left wing of his party but struggled to build a national profile and has suffered a number of political setbacks in his time as mayor
5/25 Pete Buttigieg
The centrist Indiana mayor and war veteran would be the first openly LGBT+ president in American history
6/25 Michael Bloomberg
Michael Bloomberg, a late addition to the 2020 race, announced his candidacy after months of speculation in November. He has launched a massive ad-buying campaign and issued an apology for the controversial “stop and frisk” programme that adversely impacted minority communities in New York City when he was mayor
7/25 DROPPED OUT: Beto O’Rourke
The former Texas congressman formally launched his bid for the presidency in March. He ran on a progressive platform, stating that the US is driven by “gross differences in opportunity and outcome”
8/25 DROPPED OUT: Steve Bullock
The Montana governor announced his bid on 14 May. He stated “We need to defeat Donald Trump in 2020 and defeat the corrupt system that lets campaign money drown out the people’s voice, so we can finally make good on the promise of a fair shot for everyone.” He also highlighted the fact that he won the governor’s seat in a red [Republican] state
9/25 DROPPED OUT: Cory Booker
The New Jersey Senator has focused on restoring kindness and civility in American politics throughout his campaign, though he has failed to secure the same level of support and fundraising as several other senators running for the White House in 2020
10/25 DROPPED OUT: Wayne Messam
Mayor of the city of Miramar in the Miami metropolitan area, Wayne Messam said he intended to run on a progressive platform against the “broken” federal government. He favours gun regulations and was a signatory to a letter from some 400 mayors condemning President Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris Climate Accord
11/25 DROPPED OUT: Kirsten Gillibrand
The New York Senator formally announced her presidential bid in January, saying that healthcare should be a right, not a privilege
12/25 DROPPED OUT: Kamala Harris
The former California attorney general was introduced to the national stage during Jeff Sessions testimony. She has endorsed Medicare-for-all and proposed a major tax-credit for the middle class
13/25 DROPPED OUT: John Delaney
The Maryland congressman was the first to launch his bid for presidency, making the announcement in 2017
14/25 Tulsi Gabbard
The Hawaii congresswoman announced her candidacy in January, but has faced tough questions on her past comments on LGBT+ rights and her stance on Syrian President Bashar al-Assad
15/25 DROPPED OUT: Andrew Yang
The entrepreneur announced his presidential candidacy by pledging that he would introduce a universal basic income of $1,000 a month to every American over the age of 18
16/25 DROPPED OUT: Julian Castro
The former San Antonio mayor announced his candidacy in January and said that his running has a special meaning for the Latino community in the US
17/25 DROPPED OUT: Marianne Williamson
The author and spiritual adviser has announced her intention to run for president. She had previously run for congress as an independent in 2014 but was unsuccessful
18/25 DROPPED OUT: Eric Swalwell
One of the younger candidates, Swalwell has served on multiple committees in the House of Representatives. He intended to make gun control central to his campaign but dropped out after his team said it was clear there was no path to victory
19/25 DROPPED OUT: Seth Moulton
A Massachusetts congressman, Moulton is a former US soldier who is best known for trying to stop Nancy Pelosi from becoming speaker of the house. He dropped out of the race after not polling well in key states
20/25 Amy Klobuchar
Klobuchar is a Minnesota senator who earned praise for her contribution to the Brett Kavanaugh hearings
21/25 DROPPED OUT: Jay Inslee
Inslee has been governor of Washington since 2013. His bid was centred around climate change
22/25 DROPPED OUT: John Hickenlooper
The former governor of Colorado aimed to sell himself as an effective leader who was open to compromise, but failed to make a splash on the national stage
23/25 DROPPED OUT: Tim Ryan
Ohio representative Tim Ryan ran on a campaign that hinged on his working class roots, though his messaging did not appear to resonate with voters
24/25 Deval Patrick
The former Massachusetts governor launched a late 2020 candidacy and received very little reception. With just a few short months until the first voters flock to the polls, the former governor is running as a centrist and believes he can unite the party’s various voting blocs
25/25 Tom Steyer
Democratic presidential hopeful billionaire and philanthropist Tom Steyer is a longtime Democratic donor
At a time when the right to access abortion care is under siege when 90 per cent of counties in the US do not have an abortion provider, six states only have one clinic that provides abortion, and over 200 GOP politicians have signed an AMICUS brief urging a now conservative-leaning Supreme Court to overturn Roe v Wade — the last thing the American people need is a president who believes winning is worth risking pregnant peoples bodily autonomy.
We dont need a president worried about bringing down the number of abortions we need a president who will focus on decreasing the number of abortion restrictions, increasing the number of abortion providers, and expanding access by repealing the Hyde Amendment, which bans federal funds from paying for abortions. 
We need someone who doesnt debate abortion because they know it is not up for debate the majority of Americans support access to abortion care. We need a leader who knows that to play politics with a constitutional right afforded to every person who can get pregnant is to take a page from Donald Trumps political playbook. Once proudly pro-choice, Trump changed his mind to secure the evangelical vote, a vote that no-doubt helped him secure the presidency in 2016. He showed voters early on that his so-called principles were for sale, and now we have children in cages on the southern border. 
If Democrats are going to continue to hail themselves as the party of moral order, then every Democrat should avoid building a tent and, instead, draw a line.