Today a jury in New York convicted former Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein of sexual assault and rape in the third degree. He was acquitted on three other counts of five.
Three thousand miles away in Hollywood, the place he once owned, some industry leaders are struggling to come to terms with how to address his crimes.
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I emphasize struggling, because while the former kingmaker has to reckon with his damaged reputation and career, Hollywood finds itself on trial as well. The New York case exposed systemic harassment within parts of the industry so much so that some people declined to be named in this piece, or even speak to me about the topic, for fear of retribution. Some who I reached out to implied that they had stories of ongoing harassment, but could not go any further than that and were unwilling to go on the record.
As Nancy Wang Yuen, the author of Reel Inequality: Hollywood Actors and Racism told me, people who work for big studios these days distance themselves from Weinstein, [but] the every day sexist commenting still exists. She adds: The impression I have from folks working in the industry is that it’s still accepted [but] its like, Lets not take it too far, you know, Im not Weinstein. This worrying development means that while Weinsteins horrific behavior is being condemned, other, similar behaviors are being given a pass because theyre seen as not as bad as decades of abusive behavior.
Hollywood means to use Weinstein as a cautionary tale. And there are a lot of high-level decision-makers out there who still have a lot to lose. Cheryl L Bedford, a producer and the founder of the group Women of Color Unite, told me that”there are a lot of people who have invested in not only Weinstein, but that type of behavior, in keeping the status quo. And some of those people are still in power. It seems this is an open secret.
Later this year, Weinstein will face trial in Los Angeles on charges of raping one woman and sexually assaulting another; charges that could result in 28 years in prison. Unlike the trial in New York, this will bring Weinsteins scandal to the industrys doorstep. There will be renewed pressure for the industry to reckon with the skeletons in its closet.
Relationships are the currency of Hollywood.Trust is the reason deals are made; its the key to getting and keeping a job. The downside is that loyalty can blind us to the faults of others and theres no general consensus on what it means to be complicit. One source I spoke to about these issues shared an exchange she had about an executive who was forced to resign because of harassment claims:I actually ended up seeing him at a film festival. I ended up talking to a woman and she was like, Oh, well he’s totally innocent. There’s not a problem. The person that accused him, it was her fault. She’s making it up. I know him, I’ve known him for years. He’s totally innocent. I obviously was not a witness to any of it, but it just struck me as, there’s always going to be people that believe the other side.
So much for believing women.
According to some, people on the other end of the food chain feel like the decision-makers keep winning because they control the narrative and the people who tell them. We witnessed how this sort of far-reaching power works during Weinsteins New York trial. One day before the jury was set to deliberate, an op-ed by his lawyer Donna Rotunno was published in Newsweek. The piece urged jurors in the New York case to look past the headlines and explicitly stated that Harvey Weinstein was innocent. A defense lawyer writing and placing an article in a major publication during an ongoing trial should have been scandalous but somehow Weinsteins team made it happen anyway. 
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On January 6 the trial process began in New York. Harvey Weinstein arrived using a walking aid, looking frail
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Actresses Rose McGowan, Rosanna Arquette and other women protested outside court after he arrived
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Jury selection was completed on 21 January and the rape and sexual assualt trial began in earnest the next day
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Prosecutor Joan Illuzzi-Orbon
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Assistant District Attorney Meghan Hast points at Harvey Weinstein during his sexual assault trial as accuser Mimi Haleyi appears on the screen
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Files arrive at the rape trial
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Lawyer Damon Cheronis stands near his client
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Louis R Aidala attends the trial
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Harvey Weinstein is photographed by members of the media as leaves court with the aid of a walker
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Attorney Gloria Allred speaks to the media during the trial
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Harvey Weinstein arrives to court with the support of the members of his defense team
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Actress Annabella Sciorra arrives to testify as a witness
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Harvey Weinstein looks on as she is questioned by prosecutor Joan Illuzzi-Orbon on the stand
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Assistant District Attorneys Meghan Hast, left, and Joan Illuzzi leave the Harvey Weinstein rape trial during the lunch break
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Actress Ellen Barkin arrives after a lunch break to watch the case of film producer Harvey Weinstein
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Harvey Weinstein’s attorney Donna Rotunno leaves Manhattan Supreme Court
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Kara Young exits after testifying
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Film producer Harvey Weinstein takes notes as Dr. Barbara Ziv testifies in front of Judge James Burke as she is questioned by prosecutor Joan Illuzzi-Orbon
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Dr. Barbara Ziv leaves court after testifying
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Actor Rosie Perez points at film producer Harvey Weinstein as she testifies
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Rosie Perez exits after testifying
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Mimi Haleyi, former production assistant, arrives to testify
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A member of the prosecution pushes a cart loaded with files
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Harvey Weinstein looks on as Mimi Haleyi testifies
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Elizabeth Entin, right, a witness in the Harvey Weinstein rape and sexual assault trial, walks towards the courtroom with Assistant District Attorney Meghan Hast
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Harvey Weinstein smiles as he arrives for his trial
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Witness Elizabeth Entin is questioned by Assistant District Attorney Meghan Hast
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Tarale Wulff, witness in the trial, leaves the courtroom for a break
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Witness Dawn Dunning is cross-examined by defense lawyer Arthur Aidala
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Lincoln Davies, a former boyfriend of accuser Dawn Dunning, leaves court after testifying
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Weinstein looks into the camera as he leaves court on 29 January
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Dev Sen, an attorney from Boies Schiller, leaves after testifying
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Witness Monika Mikkelsen testifies
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Photos are passed around to the jury
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Hotel worker Rothschild Capulong testifies under a photo of the lobby of the DoubleTree Hotel in Midtown as Judge James Burke listens
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Playwright Warren Leight arrives to Criminal Court
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Professor Elizabeth Loftus is questioned by lawyer Diana Fabi Samson in front of Judge James Burke
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Actress Talita Maia leaves after testifying
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Nelson Lopez is questioned by defense lawyer Arthur Aidala
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Model Claudia Salinas leaves court after testifying
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Harvey Weinstein and lawyer, Donna Rotunna arrive at court smiling on 14 February
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District Attorney Cyrus Vance, Jr watches as prosecutor Joan Illuzzi-Orbon gives her closing arguments in front of Judge James Burke on February 14
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Weinstein departs the same day with a smile on his face
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The press watch as Harvey Weinstein and his legal team arrive at the Criminal Court on February 18
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Judge James Burke, left, instructs the jurors before they begin deliberating on Harvey Weinstein’s rape trial. The panel of seven men and five women heard instructions in the law from the judge before going behind closed doors to consider charges
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Harvey Weinstein sits with his attorney Donna Rotunno as Judge James Burke instructs the jury on charges as they begin deliberations
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Women watch as Harvey Weinstein exits the courtroom
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Harvey Weinstein arrives to hear verdict
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Weinstein sits at the defense table reading papers during jury deliberations
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On January 6 the trial process began in New York. Harvey Weinstein arrived using a walking aid, looking frail
2/50
Actresses Rose McGowan, Rosanna Arquette and other women protested outside court after he arrived
3/50
Jury selection was completed on 21 January and the rape and sexual assualt trial began in earnest the next day
4/50
Prosecutor Joan Illuzzi-Orbon
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Assistant District Attorney Meghan Hast points at Harvey Weinstein during his sexual assault trial as accuser Mimi Haleyi appears on the screen
6/50
Files arrive at the rape trial
7/50
Lawyer Damon Cheronis stands near his client
8/50
Louis R Aidala attends the trial
9/50
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Harvey Weinstein is photographed by members of the media as leaves court with the aid of a walker
11/50
Attorney Gloria Allred speaks to the media during the trial
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Harvey Weinstein arrives to court with the support of the members of his defense team
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Actress Annabella Sciorra arrives to testify as a witness
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Harvey Weinstein looks on as she is questioned by prosecutor Joan Illuzzi-Orbon on the stand
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Assistant District Attorneys Meghan Hast, left, and Joan Illuzzi leave the Harvey Weinstein rape trial during the lunch break
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Actress Ellen Barkin arrives after a lunch break to watch the case of film producer Harvey Weinstein
17/50
Harvey Weinstein’s attorney Donna Rotunno leaves Manhattan Supreme Court
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Kara Young exits after testifying
19/50
Film producer Harvey Weinstein takes notes as Dr. Barbara Ziv testifies in front of Judge James Burke as she is questioned by prosecutor Joan Illuzzi-Orbon
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Dr. Barbara Ziv leaves court after testifying
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Actor Rosie Perez points at film producer Harvey Weinstein as she testifies
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Rosie Perez exits after testifying
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Mimi Haleyi, former production assistant, arrives to testify
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A member of the prosecution pushes a cart loaded with files
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Harvey Weinstein looks on as Mimi Haleyi testifies
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Elizabeth Entin, right, a witness in the Harvey Weinstein rape and sexual assault trial, walks towards the courtroom with Assistant District Attorney Meghan Hast
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Harvey Weinstein smiles as he arrives for his trial
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Witness Elizabeth Entin is questioned by Assistant District Attorney Meghan Hast
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Tarale Wulff, witness in the trial, leaves the courtroom for a break
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Witness Dawn Dunning is cross-examined by defense lawyer Arthur Aidala
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Lincoln Davies, a former boyfriend of accuser Dawn Dunning, leaves court after testifying
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Weinstein looks into the camera as he leaves court on 29 January
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Dev Sen, an attorney from Boies Schiller, leaves after testifying
34/50
Witness Monika Mikkelsen testifies
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Photos are passed around to the jury
36/50
Hotel worker Rothschild Capulong testifies under a photo of the lobby of the DoubleTree Hotel in Midtown as Judge James Burke listens
37/50
Playwright Warren Leight arrives to Criminal Court
38/50
Professor Elizabeth Loftus is questioned by lawyer Diana Fabi Samson in front of Judge James Burke
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Actress Talita Maia leaves after testifying
40/50
Nelson Lopez is questioned by defense lawyer Arthur Aidala
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Model Claudia Salinas leaves court after testifying
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Harvey Weinstein and lawyer, Donna Rotunna arrive at court smiling on 14 February
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District Attorney Cyrus Vance, Jr watches as prosecutor Joan Illuzzi-Orbon gives her closing arguments in front of Judge James Burke on February 14
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Weinstein departs the same day with a smile on his face
45/50
The press watch as Harvey Weinstein and his legal team arrive at the Criminal Court on February 18
46/50
Judge James Burke, left, instructs the jurors before they begin deliberating on Harvey Weinstein’s rape trial. The panel of seven men and five women heard instructions in the law from the judge before going behind closed doors to consider charges
47/50
Harvey Weinstein sits with his attorney Donna Rotunno as Judge James Burke instructs the jury on charges as they begin deliberations
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Women watch as Harvey Weinstein exits the courtroom
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Harvey Weinstein arrives to hear verdict
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Weinstein sits at the defense table reading papers during jury deliberations
Between this, and the controversial firing of Gabrielle Union-Wade from the show Americas Got Talent, reportedly for raising allegations of racially insensitive and sexist behavior, and its no wonder the people who work for the studios feel queasy. 
As we reflect on what lies ahead for Weinstein, the industry is bracing itself for more intense scrutiny. On Tuesday the same day jurors started deliberating on Weinsteins case, Breakdown Services, a major casting company, was hit with a lawsuit from a former employee, for amongst other things sexual assault, employee rape and highly negligent management methods. Crucially, this case holds a company to task for hiring a convicted sex offender to a supervisory position where he harassed, threatened and raped [the] plaintiff, according to court documents. Those people at the bottom of the food chain are now biting back at companies rather than simply individuals. What that might mean financially for the industry is important, and could force those at the top to start taking action against sexism, whether or not they feel morally that they should stand up for womens rights.
There is a world in which the industry comes out of the Weinstein affair stronger and better than ever before. Lets hope that enough insiders take up that opportunity so that I never again have to report on a scandal where most people are too afraid to go on the record.